UN Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief_25th November 2018

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UN_Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief

Considering that one of the basic principles of the Charter of the United Nations is that of the dignity and equality inherent in all human beings, and that all Member States have pledged themselves to take joint and separate action in co-operation with the Organization to promote and encourage universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion,…

UN_Resolution adopted by the General Assembly

The General Assembly,…
Recalling its resolution 36/55 of 25 November 1981, by which it proclaimed the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief,…
Recalling also article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,1
article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2 and other relevant human rights provisions,…
Recalling further its previous resolutions on the elimination of all forms of
intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief, including resolution
64/164 of 18 December 2009, as well as Human Rights Council resolution 14/11 of
18 June 2010,…

Catholic.org.au_Discussion Paper

Introduction
Australia has been active for some time in the international community’s attempts to formulate and to articulate certain basic rights and freedoms for individuals and for nations.

1. We note that recently, a number of judges of superior courts have recognised that international law is “a legitimate and important influence on the development of the common law, especially when international law declares the existence of universal human rights.”

2. This does not contradict the recognised principle of international law that international instruments, whatever their character, be they convention, declaration or protocol, do not have force, as of right, in domestic or municipal law.

3. It should be remembered, of course, that international instruments are forged in discussions between peoples of diverse cultural, religious, political and legal traditions. Equally, the instruments,…

 

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